December 2, 2020

Mercy not Sacrifice (5): Redemptive Hospitality

Mercy not Sacrifice (5): Redemptive Hospitality We are thinking through Richard Beck’s illuminating book, Unclean: Meditations on Purity, Hospitality, and Mortality. So far, we’ve talked about disgust psychology, contagion logic, sociomoral disgust, and contempt. Beck’s goal is to help us understand the impulses we have that move us to reject or accept, to see as […]

Mercy not Sacrifice (4): The Act that Counters Contempt

Mercy not Sacrifice (4): The Act that Counters Contempt We are thinking through Richard Beck’s illuminating book, Unclean: Meditations on Purity, Hospitality, and Mortality. In our first post, we introduced his suggestion that disgust psychology can help explain the ways we view and treat other people. Do we view them through the lens of sacrifice […]

Mercy not Sacrifice (2): How do we view the “unclean”?

We are thinking through Richard Beck’s illuminating book, Unclean: Meditations on Purity, Hospitality, and Mortality. In our first post, we introduced his suggestion that disgust psychology can help explain the ways we view and treat other people. Beck’s focus in this study will be on the church, and answers to questions like: Why do churches, […]

Mercy not Sacrifice (part 1)

One of the most important and influential books I have read in the last decade is Richard Beck’s Unclean: Meditations on Purity, Hospitality, and Mortality. Along with Jonathan Haidt’s The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion, Beck’s book pulls back the curtain on some fundamental reasons why we think and […]

Our Moral Impulses — And Appreciating Our Neighbors’

Peaceable Kingdom (1846) Hicks Note from CM: Sorry folks, but I see I’ve lost the battle today. I feel like the substitute teacher who has no hope of bringing order to the class. Please, either start responding to the points the post makes, or I will close comments for today. Here’s my summary of what […]

Musings on Moral Theology (4)

Note from CM: This is our final meditation on Jonathan Haidt’s book, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion. Soon, we will take a look at Richard Beck’s book, Unclean: Meditations on Purity, Hospitality, and Mortality, as a complement to this series. • • • Musings on Moral Theology (4) […]

A Conversation with Jonathan Haidt and Tim Keller

Note from CM: I realize that this is a long presentation, but believe me, it is worth your while. Perhaps you can break it down into segments and watch them throughout the week. I would be happy to receive comments today, Tuesday, or Wednesday on this video. Here is a prime example of civil conversation […]

Musings on Moral Theology (3)

Note from CM: Our Ordinary Time Bible Study in Philippians will be switched to Fridays, to allow three days at the beginning of week to cover other topics. • • • Musings on Moral Theology (3) Moral psychology can help to explain why the Democratic Party has had so much difficulty connecting with voters since […]

Musings in Moral Theology (2)

Musings in Moral Theology (2) The central metaphor of these four chapters is that the mind is divided, like a rider on an elephant, and the rider’s job is to serve the elephant. The rider is our conscious reasoning—the stream of words and images of which we are fully aware. The elephant is the other […]

Musings in Moral Theology (1)

Musings in Moral Theology (1) I chose the title The Righteous Mind to convey the sense that human nature is not just intrinsically moral, it’s also intrinsically moralistic, critical, and judgmental. • Jonathan Haidt The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion • Sacrifice—the purity impulse—marks off a zone of holiness, […]