July 10, 2020

Fall, or Folly? (2): A Wisdom Story

The Last Judgment (detail), Bosch

The Last Judgment (detail), Bosch

St. Irenaeus (2nd century) described Adam and Eve as “adolescents.” They were not “perfect” in the sense of “complete.” They represent a beginning and an intention – but something that not only remained unfulfilled – but even something that had deviated from its intended path. From “mud commanded to become Gods,” they became beings unable to be truly human. Death and corruption mark their existence. The stories in Genesis include fratricide among their children. The early chapters of Genesis are not the record of a promising start – they are the record of the start of promises.

• Fr. Stephen Freeman, “From Mud to Light – the Saving Work of Christ”

• • •

tree

The Last Judgment (detail), Bosch

We do not normally think of the Book of Proverbs as a work of deep theological content. We think of it as a collection of sayings, practical in nature, giving sound advice for living. But portions of the book go far beyond that.

Take Proverbs 1-9 for instance, which form an extended meditation on the nature and blessings of divine Wisdom (personified), urging the young in particular to open their ears and hearts to receive her teachings so that they will “fear the Lord,” become wise in their lives and dealings, and find the reward of “life.”

Proverbs teaches “the simple” (the young, morally unformed, susceptible to temptation) to listen to and follow “wisdom” (fear the Lord and follow his instructions), because listening to wisdom is the path to “life” and failing to do so leads to “death.”

One characteristic of wisdom literature is that its teachings are rooted in creation more than in covenant. That is, they reflect on the world and life and the characteristics of people and how they relate to each other. Its counsels derive from observation, not from special revelation. To put it simply, wisdom posits that God designed creation and life to work in certain ways. The wise person trusts God and seeks to order his or her life according to those ways. He or she “trusts in the Lord with a whole heart.” The foolish person disregards God and seeks to live “leaning on his or her own understanding.”

I suggested in the previous post that the story of Adam and Eve in Genesis is a wisdom story. Those who composed and edited the Hebrew Bible in its final form were concerned that the post-exilic community learn wisdom about their past, present, and future. So they told the first stories about people in the Bible using wisdom terms and metaphors to make their message clear from the start.

This same language and imagery is prevalent in other wisdom literature, like Proverbs. Here are a few examples:

Genesis 2-4 The Book of Proverbs
Now the serpent was more crafty [shrewd] (3:1)

To teach shrewdness to the simple (1:4)

The woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was to be desired to make one wise (3:6) Do not be wise in your own eyes; fear the Lord, and turn away from evil (3:7)
…the tree of life also in the midst of the garden (2:9)…he might reach out his hand and take also from the tree of life and live forever (3:22)…he placed the cherubim, and a sword flaming and turning to guard the way to the tree of life (3:24) She is a tree of life to those who lay hold of her; those who hold her fast are called happy (3:18) 

 

Sin is lurking at the door; its desire is for you, but you must master it. …When they were in the field, Cain rose up against his brother Abel and killed him (4:7-8) My child, if sinners entice you, do not consent. If they say, “Come with us, let us lie in wait for blood, let us wantonly ambush the innocent… (1:10-11)
You may freely eat of every tree of the garden; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall die (2:16-17)

For whoever finds me finds life and obtains favor from the Lord; but those who miss me injure themselves; all who hate me love death (8:35-36)

• • •

The story of Adam and Eve has been often portrayed as the story of two perfect people in perfect conditions who “fell” into a state of corruption and mortality and plunged all creation into such a condition because of rebellion. But “fall” is not really the best description, or at least the most accurate description of what this story teaches.

Instead, Genesis 3 tells how God set boundaries for two children (or adolescents, as Irenaeus suggested) who are “simple” — youthful, naïve, inexperienced, morally unformed, and susceptible to temptation.

  • Look at them: “naked and not ashamed,” like children who don’t even know enough to be embarrassed as they frolic about without clothing.
  • Look at them: enticed by a treat that looks good, that promises to taste good, something that engages a childlike curiosity which knows no caution.
  • Look at them: easily distracted from their parent’s warning by a cleverer, wiser tempter.
  • Look at them: persuaded into transgressing the boundaries set for them without even thinking.

This is not the “fall” of the perfect. This is Pinocchio, led astray by Lampwick at Pleasure Island!

[T]he Adam story is not about a fall down from perfection, but a failure to grow up to godly wisdom and maturity. Adam and Eve weren’t like perfect super humans. They were like young, naïve children, who were meant to grow into obedience, but were tricked into following a different path.

. . . The serpent tricked Adam and Eve into gaining wisdom too soon, apart from God’s way. They were naïve children who did not have the shrewdness to withstand the serpent’s craftiness. They should have just trusted their maker. The knowledge of good and evil isn’t wrong, but getting it free from God’s direction is death. Without the maturity that comes from obeying God, Adam and Eve can’t handle the truth (said in our best Jack Nicholson voice).

This is the point of this story: the choice put before Adam and Eve is the same choice put before Israel every day: learn to listen to God and follow in his ways and then— only then— you will live. The story of Adam and Eve makes this point in the form of a story; Proverbs makes it in the form of wisdom literature; Israel’s long story in the Old Testament makes it in the form of history writing.

• Byas and Enns, Genesis for Normal People

This story was intended first for Israel, who throughout their history followed the same patterns set by Adam and Eve and then by their children Cain and Abel and were likewise sent off into exile from God’s good land.

But one effect of reading this as a wisdom story is that it tends to universalize its message. Jew and Gentile alike, we recognize ourselves in the stories of Adam and Eve and their children. As one of our commenters said in yesterday’s thread: Adam is everyman. And Eve is everywoman. These stories reveal the universal human susceptibility to temptation. We all show ourselves to be simpletons, in need of divine wisdom.

As Pinocchio found out, no one becomes a “real boy” without first realizing he’s made a jackass of himself at Pleasure Island.

We all need to learn: “Trust in the Lord with a whole heart, and do not lean on your own understanding” (Prov. 3:5).

And specifically, we must put off the old foolish Adam who leads us to death and put on the new man, Christ, who became for us wisdom from God, and righteousness and sanctification and redemption (1Cor 1:30). He is our Tree of Life.

 

Comments

  1. “Whoever saves one life,
    it as if they have saved the entire world.” –
    (the Talmud)

    so closely interwoven into the Genesis story of Adam and Eve is the idea that the life of even ONE single person has great value. This concept does flow from the idea of Adam as the ‘first of many’ of human-kind.
    So, I do see the ‘wisdom’ connection in Genesis as it applies to our understanding of the dignity of every individual human person as made in the image of God and bearing within himself (or herself) a God-given immortal soul . . .

    • I like this, Christiane. It fits with the idea that was bandied about yesterday that if one views “Adam and Eve” as metaphorical “humankind,” then the Genesis story tells me that God desires a relationship with ALL people.

  2. Perfection and innocence aren’t contradictory. Haven’t you read Perelandra? 😉

    • It has been a long time since I’ve read Perelandra, so you’ll have to remind me of Lewis’s take on that.

      However, in Genesis, I think Pinocchio is the better analogy. He’s not yet a “real boy” — unformed, susceptible. There is an innocence to childhood that is not perfection. Of course, it is delightful in its own way, but it is fraught with dangerous possibility as well.

      • http://blog.spu.edu/cbte/2010/10/11/perelandra-a-metaphorical-midrash-on-genesis/

        “As Lewis imagines it, evil may arise not only out of banality but also, ironically, out of good intentions. We tend to think of temptation as something that appeals to the baser part of our nature. But those in a state of innocence would not yet have a baser nature, or a full comprehension of evil or wrong. Thus a tempter would need to appeal to the innocent’s sense of good and right in order to turn her from it.”

        This seems more in-line with an Adam and Eve created as adults, yet morally good and innocent.

    • I’m currently re-reading the Space Trilogy. Really interesting ideas and speculation with respect to “what if there was no Fall?” sort of things. I’m about 2/3 through Out of the Silent Planet now, in which the sentient folks on Mars are innocent, but not immortal. There’s still death, hunting, risk, and even a measure of technology and science as we see a world toward the end of its life, albeit still without a Fall.

      In Perelandria we see the opposite. We see a new word that is in the beginning of its life in innocence, and that is in danger of being corrupted by Evil.

  3. Yes, they are incomplete, immature, unfinished. And like every wounded adolescent, aka infant terrible, they cling to their woundedness and their incompleteness as if these were wholeness and maturity; therein lay the real human sin of obstinate blindness. The story of human imperfection and sin is the long history, the biography, of the wounded adolescent, the infant terrible, clinging forever to his/her incompleteness, and the choices that stem from it, as if these were the marks of adulthood. Since around the late 1950’s it’s been given a new name: youth culture.

  4. One thing I really like about today and yesterday’s reading of Adam and Eve’s story is that it relates their experience more directly to the more universal human experience.

    Some hasty thoughts:

    In a reading of the story where Adam and Eve are already perfect – as though they were born old and very wise, with all excellences already established within them, as though this were as natural a state as breathing, and are even immortal – we don’t encounter ourselves in them. They may as well be Martians, except for their apparent genetic similarity to us. Some lessons can be derived from a picture of an idyllic final state. Still, they’re useful mainly as a point of contrast and an explanation for sin.

    By contrast, in this reading, two things leap out to me. First, Adam and Eve’s ‘incompleteness’ isn’t totally unlike our own, even prefall, nor is their transgression. So their drama is ours. Adam and Adam’s kin are meant not just to be but to become. Also, insofar as it predates sin, their incompleteness isn’t the same thing as being a ‘worm;” youthful Adam is a good thing. But he requires God, and Eve, and creation, and a certain harmony between all of them, to be what he ought to be. Perhaps he’s also meant to do something in the garden, other than enjoy edenic summer camp, that he never accomplished. (Interestingly, our apocalyptic literature doesn’t picture our return to a Babylonian hanging garden: we have a city, as though civilization in the between periods meant something, but got to its destination by a very windy road.)

    Second, incomplete Adam and Eve are notable not so much because they have a superlative nature in themselves, but because they are the recipients of divine provision. God has taken the initiative to create the Garden and put Adam and Eve within it. God puts the Tree of Life there. God establishes the conditions of trust and the couple are living inside this reality. In this sense, the first story isn’t about a totally perfect creation that is all destroyed, but is the first round in God blessing and establishing fellowship with people, an action without which humanity remains incomplete and cannot become what it ought to be.

    • Well summarized.

    • Adam Tauno Williams says

      > except for their apparent genetic similarity to us

      Which is what? Perhaps non-technical people can overlook this – but there is not Biologic similarity between a perfect Adam & Eve and us.

      They were immortal [no aging], physically incorruptible [no disease, no poisoning?], devoid of defect [heart murmer, color blindness, no hearing loss, joint inflammation?], and capable of recovering from any injury – or simply impervious to injury? Could Adam step off a cliff, plummet to the bottom, and get back up again?

      If this is the Adam & Eve proposed by the “traditional” Fall story… then they were physically beings utterly different than ourselves. I would expect no genetic similarity.

      • Your point is well taken, and I concede to it. If there were a Perfect Adam and Eve, the fall would have to involve a substantial rewriting of their genes.

        >Could Adam step off a cliff, plummet to the bottom, and get back up again?

        Heh, well, one advantage of being perfect is probably being smart enough not to walk off cliffs, or slip. Assuming there are any cliffs in Eden. Maybe they’re all blocked by safety gates.

        Joking aside, it never occurred to me before, but: I suppose the whole problem of falling from high places presents does strange problem for any tale with immoral beings inhabiting physical universes.

        Ever read the Priest’s Tale in “Hyperion”?

      • -> ” Could Adam step off a cliff, plummet to the bottom, and get back up again?”

        I see a new Marvel superhero “origin” story, one of Biblical proportions! “Adam the Indestructible! Man of Flesh, Made by God!”

        Unfortunately, since everything is perfect, he doesn’t have much to do.

      • Dr. Fundystan, Proctologist says

        But they weren’t immortal. Again, there is a significant gap between what the text actually says and maybe some of our received traditions.

        • Yes. In the subject paragraph, my reference is to an interpretation of the text, not to the text per se.

    • Adam Tauno Williams says

      … doesn’t picture our return to a Babylonian hanging garden: we have a city, as though civilization in the between periods meant something, but got to its destination…

      This!

  5. David Cornwell says

    ” (Interestingly, our apocalyptic literature doesn’t picture our return to a Babylonian hanging garden: we have a city, as though civilization in the between periods meant something, but got to its destination by a very windy road.)”

    Great observation. Thinking of this City can set one’s mind to buzzing. Life in garden life is fairly simple (well, maybe not), but life in the city is layered with complexity upon complexity.

    One night late I was driving into Indianapolis to meet a plane. Approaching the airport one can see outlines of the lit up city. Expressways intersect each other and signs point the way. At the edges of the airport cargo planes are loaded and unloaded. Planes fly low approaching the runways. The electrical grid keeps it all humming. Computers organize it. Control towers direct landings and takeoffs. And this is just one tiny aspect of the humming city, one small corner.

    In the mist of it all is human life. Men and women are working to support children, some of them ill. Death interrupts at unscheduled interval. Everyone troubled about one thing or the other. Temptation is everywhere. Choices are not black and white, but are themselves multilayered.

    Thus when we come to the promise of the City of God my imagination is again put to work. Revelation 21 describes just a bit of this glorious complexity.

    • Adam Tauno Williams says

      > Men and women are working to support children,
      > some of them ill. Death interrupts at unscheduled interval.
      > Everyone troubled about one thing or the other.

      All true.

      Also there is friendship, laughter, birth, innovation, creativity, music, architecture, compassion, love, contented napping, feasting, ….

      > Temptation is everywhere

      And triumph is to be found as well.

    • Headless Unicorn Guy says

      Thus when we come to the promise of the City of God my imagination is again put to work. Revelation 21 describes just a bit of this glorious complexity.

      Sounds like you’d lose a LOT when you condense it into a couple proof-text sound bites or chapter-and-verse zip codes.

  6. A question I asked late yesterday that may have gotten lost in the mix and might be more suitable here anyway was this:

    If Adam and Eve were created “perfect”…was Adam and Eve’s “fall” (or humankind’s broken condition) because of human choice or part of God’s plan and design?

    (And because I’m on this “no theology or denomination has it exactly right” kick, maybe the answer is a mix of Calvinistic “all part of God’s plan” and Arminian “people make their choices”.)

    • Actually, Rick, I’ve been pondering your question as well as these two OP’s. Interestingly, over at Jesus Creed, RJS has a post up called; Reclaiming the Good News. She quotes Phillip Yancy:
      “The oft-misunderstood Christian notion of sin makes many people uncomfortable. Indeed, it establishes a clear line of accountability – but to a God who loves me and has my best interests at heart. Again the parallel to a doctor applies. Coming from a strict church background, I missed this good-news aspect of God’s wisdom. I thought of God as a cosmic policeman enforcing arbitrary rules rather than as a doctor who wants me to thrive. … At the heart of sin lies a lack of trust that God intends the best for us.
      Ignatius of Loyola defined sin as refusing to believe that God wants my happiness and fulfillment. Human rebellion began in the Garden of Eden when God said in effect, “Trust me. I know what is best for you.” Adam and Eve failed the test, and we’ve paid the consequences ever since. … For our own well-being we need to trust God for basic guidance about how to live. (p. 79)”
      RJS then says: “This is an interesting twist on the story of Adam and Eve. Instead of Adam and Eve wanting to usurp God and become gods, they failed to trust God. They failed to trust that he knew what was best and looked on them with love, interested in their well-being and flourishing in life.”
      So no, I don’t think God created Adam and Eve as “perfect”. In fact the Hebrew word “good” I’m told has the idea of functioning as God intended it. They were created innocent, as yet untried. They were not immortal, else why would he exile them BEFORE they could eat of the tree of life. God’s plan was for them to understand the knowledge of good and evil, but under His guidance and tutelage. That is why the idea that this not only refers to the first humans but to every human as they move from childhood to maturity appeals to me. It fits like a hand to glove. Every parent wants their children to understand good and evil but they don’t want them to PLUNGE into evil in order to understand it. We want to guide them through the reefs, not shipwreck on them.
      And God wants each and every man to grow up but also mankind to grow up. The church is supposed to prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; 12 For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ: 13 Till we all come in the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ: 14 That we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive; 15 But speaking the truth in love, may grow up into him in all things, which is the head, even Christ…”
      Was this “fall” inevitable? Was it inevitable you would fail to trust you parents completely? Is it inevitable that you and I fail NOW to trust God completely, even after the indwelling of the Spirit? Tough questions, but we know no one except Jesus who “walked according to the Spirit, and did not fulfill the lusts of the flesh”. So back to your question, “was Adam and Eve’s “fall” (or humankind’s broken condition) because of human choice or part of God’s plan and design?” The answer is yes. His plans account for our choices. Right? Was Jesus the back up plan? Plan B? Oh, sheesh, look what those humans have gone and done, wait, I’ve got a plan, I’ll become a man, go to the cross, fool the serpent, rise from the dead… No, the Lamb was slain from the foundation of the world. He WAS and IS and IS TO COME. The Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. To whom be the glory forever and ever- AMEN.

      • Oops, the Ephesian quote paragraph is supposed to be: “And God wants each and every man to grow up but also mankind to grow up. The church is supposed to provide the example; hence Ephesians 4:11-15 And he gave some, apostles; and prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; 12 For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ: 13 Till we all come in the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ: 14 That we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive; 15 But speaking the truth in love, may grow up into him in all things, which is the head, even Christ…”

      • Thanks for the post, Mike! Good stuff here. Two things in it that resonate with me.

        1) The idea that God has what’s best for us. I keep forgetting that. In fact, I often tell kids, when teaching about the Ten Commandments, that they aren’t intended as “party-pooper” rules and “Rules God is Ready to Punish Us for For Not Following,” but rather they are Commandments to keep us safe in Him and with others. My analogy is speed limits. Speed limits aren’t intended as something “to keep us from having fun while driving.” They’re there to keep us safe and from harming others. I sometimes tell them, “A person can go ahead and drive 100 mph in a 30 mph zone, but I guarantee some bad things will probably result. Not all the time, maybe, but most likely at some point that method of driving will have bad results.” And yes…the “fall” is when we fail to trust God and speed limit “deciders” that they are trying to keep us safe by setting boundaries/limits.

        2) The idea that “perfect” means “as God intended.” I keep forgetting that, too. If God created me to be a pen, then He just wants me to be a pen. He doesn’t want me sky-writing, He doesn’t want me writing as if I’m an erasable pencil, He doesn’t want me thinking I’m a Sharpie. He just wants me to know I’m a pen and that He loves me for being a pen. What that means is that I should write when asked and make sure I’m filled with ink, and my “perfect-ness aka intended-ness” wobbles when I fail to write when asked, or run out of ink, or try to be something other than a pen. Again, our “fall” comes when we fail to trust God that He wants us to be who He intended us to be.

      • In God’s world good and evil are an ecology. The whole world is an ecology of opposites dancing with each other. And God loves their dance. The real sin at the tree of knowledge of good and evil was man trying to manage good and evil as God does not manage them. God lets evil be. Given the actions of people God is not, except in very rare circumstances, in the business of preventing their consequences.

        Robert Capon

    • Headless Unicorm Guy says

      (And because I’m on this “no theology or denomination has it exactly right” kick, maybe the answer is a mix of Calvinistic “all part of God’s plan” and Arminian “people make their choices”.)

      Remember the story of the seven blind men trying to describe an elephant?

  7. If Adam and Eve went from childhood to the lessons of adulthood, I believe it is improper to refer to this as a “fall”. It is true that we all now have these lessons to learn, but that seems to me to be the whole point of this setup that started with Adam and Eve. If there were other “people” at the time, Adam and Eve seem to have been the first to have been given free will, and the results were inevitable until Jesus came along to demonstrate how it could be done.

    I do believe there was a “Fall” and this involved that mysterious story of Lucifer and a third of the angels. This has definitely affected us all from Adam and Eve on downward, or perhaps better, upward. If Earth had not become the abode of the Satan, like Napoleon on Elba, life would be much different here and this school would not be the toughest in the Universe.

    Whoever or whatever the Satan is in actuality, he would seem to epitomize the results of following the ego out to its ultimate extreme. Eating the “apple” would be like a gateway drug for those so disposed, which apparently we all are to one extent or other. I have a lot of empathy with our first parents.

    • Yes. It seems to me that Christian tradition has become overly concerned with apologetics, and part of this involves feeling the need to explain the origins and/or causes of things, such as evil, sin, corruption, and death. But what if the Bible doesn’t actually answer all of those questions? What if we actually don’t have information about the origins of evil, how the powers arrayed against God “fell,” or how exactly that all relates to God’s good creation? The serpent was already in the garden. How did it get there? Beats me. The world as humans have known it has apparently always been an imperfect world, and humans susceptible to sin. I don’t feel any need to explain how that all began to appreciate the work of Christ.

      • Headless Unicorn Guy says

        CULTS tend to have ALL The Answers to Life, the Universe, and Everything spelled out in word-for-word detail. No ambiguity, no gaps in the sources, no need to think or understand, just Recite the Party Line.

        • Well, HUG, it’s.not just the cults that think they have all the answers, its Christian denominations too! And some of the differences will never be reconciled The disturbing thing is that there is distain among the hierarchy of the different groups but they pretend there isn’t So real attempts at ecumenism are just tokenism. At least here on imonk, dialogue is open and honest Some are off the wall, but we are all somewhat. I’ve been a non-denomational evangelical my whole life; and yeah, its not popular here at all. But that’s okay, I can take it. The richness and challenge of this blog is worth a few hits. By the way, “SoCal rules”.

          • George Christiansen says

            Depend upon one’s definition of cult. The absence of freedom to question would be the first sign, regardless how orthodox they things being questioned appear to be.

        • In my view the word “cult” has become pretty much useless. It’s basic meaning is something like “a particular system of religious worship, especially with reference to its rites and ceremonies” and comes from the same root as “culture”. From that standpoint all of Old Prophet’s denominations would be cults in the basic sense of the word, and most of them pointing the cult finger at others. It would be amusing were it not so sad.

          CM is certainly right on in identifying apologetics as a major culprit in this mess. What started out as a rhetorical device to explain your position to others evolved into creeds and confessions that are essentially negative in nature, separating themselves from all the others who are seen as heretics and cults. I have come to see Systematic Theologies as the dead end of this two thousand year old trend away from Spirit and toward the letter of the law. And they get churned out year by year like industrial smokestacks belching out pollutants to keep the economy rolling.

          • David Cornwell says

            As you say, many have become defensive in nature building walls around our little denominational fortresses about distinctives that have very little real relevance to most followers of Jesus and little to do with everyday life. Clergy and other religious professionals put great stock in them because it puts them in the drivers’ seats.

            So if you find a denomination where there is trouble and threat of schism, rather than being those who heal, clergy instigate and stir up doctrinal strife. Sometimes theological schools and their professors also get involved because theology of one type of the other keep them afloat. Accuse the other side of being unscriptural an you have a fight brewing

            In my mind someone who advocates schism is someone to stay away from. Far far away.

      • Adam Tauno Williams says

        > Christian tradition has become overly concerned with apologetic

        This.

        >Bible doesn’t actually answer all of those questions

        Which is doesn’t. At least not clearly or directly.

    • I’m surprised to find that I substantially agree with what you say in your comment, Charles.

  8. Asinus Spinas Masticans says

    About forty years ago I read a book one afternoon in a used book store. The name of the book was, simply, “Adam”. I do not remember the name of the author, but supposedly the book contained an introduction by CS Lewis, which was the reason I invested the afternoon reading it.

    I remember that it followed the Genesis narrative closely, but that it had some novel concepts about the humanity of Adam and Eve, and the nature of their discipline by God after the Fall. The entire idea of the novel was that some sort of probation had been violated and that this experiment [rational matter] had been tried over and over again in thousands of environments, in thousands of star systems stretching back to the first blue giants cooling sufficiently to allow life. The result had always been the same, yet God refused to surrender hope.

    All in all it was a very disturbing take on the Genesis story.

    Even the omniscient Google turns up nothing. Nothing whatsoever,or rather it turns up so much that it is next to useless. In the detritus of my searches, I have been astounded at how much heat Creation Science generates, and have learned that there are at least four Christian fantasy novels set in antediluvian times that must be entirely awful.